Monday, April 12, 2010

Random Monday Musings & News Worth Noting


Claiming his third Masters title, Phil Mickelson will be wearing green, making people green with envy and spending lotsa green as his cash prize was over $5 million for a good walk spoiled, indeed.


Mark Twain may have originally penned that quote about golf being a good walk spoiled, but he also played Julia Sugarbaker's long-love interest in the hit comedy "Designing Women," back in the 80's. (Okay...it wasn't Twain himself, but instead Hal Holbrook, the man best known for his Twain impersonation. In fact, it's said that he has played Twain longer than Twain was, indeed, Twain!) Julia was played by Dixie Carter. Dixie Carter passed away at the tender young age of 70 only yesterday. I loved her in Designing Women, and basically every other role that she won on talent, charm and intellect. Not just because she was beautiful and confident (in real life too) but because she was strong, independent and really something inspiring. Plus, it was a hoot to watch her go off...on war, on sisterhood, on sweet-smelling earth-sister mother rebels, and the myth of the old south.

What does Alan Greenspan think about myths? He recently said that the problem with being right 70% of the time is that the other 30% of the time you (he) is wrong. Read more here.

Speaking of blame (see above article that tries to illustrate how often we sidestep responsibility for not being able to predict the future) here is an update to the Polish plane crash investigation: it's still a horrific tragedy. No matter that the investigators are looking into the cause, the effect is the same: people are dead. Today has been called a day of mourning for the 96 victims of the plane crash, including Polish president, Lech Kaczynski, who died along with numerous other senior Polish government and military officials in the crash.

And while blame and lies all lead to corruption, some people are tired of the deceit and many more people are calling for transparency. In business, in ideals, in politics and more. And what better way to offer transparency than to jump into the conversation? Social media vehicles allow people, places and institutions to do just that. While more than 90% of big time businesses use social media, 69% of Fortune 500 corporations that have blogs and Twitter accounts interact regularly with the chatter created in the blogosphere. What's that mean to all of us who are either active in corporate life, social media or better yet, have a life? It means we are all human, stupid. And maybe the droids who run things at the big companies are starting to care about what everyone else says. Before you jump to the conclusion that people are worth making such a jump, check out this article that cleverly breaks down just how clandescent trending names and brands are being when it comes to social media. They may do it, but are they ashamed? Hmmm...lots to think about on this Monday morn...