Interesting Very Interesting

This is funny shit.

I love mint.com. It's fan-freaking-tastic. It's a site that offers free, easy, fun personal finance solutions. Not the smarmy financial credit restorers [wink wink] like enova and crap like that. Reality life-based guidance that takes into account how sucky the economy is, how young or old you may be, what you have in your pocket and what you may someday want in the bank and all the other things that responsible people need to consider when considering anything monetary. In short, it's good stuff.
Check out a recent blog post on mintlife; mint.com's lifestyle blog. It's an article on men at work. Literally. Because it's a financial business (and thus the crux of the content will always somehow circle around money matters,) it starts off by asking and answering questions like, if you had enough money, would you keep working...and how much money do you think you will need to retire...but quickly the content takes a twist and turns into...have you ever had sex with a co-worker...would you punch your boss in the face if you could get away with it? Come on...that's funny shit.

And what's more is that it is totally relevant and extremely interesting. As all things should be, no doubt.

Especially content. If you are in marketing, social media, communications or well, if you are human, then you know that content is king. Always has been, always will be. So this new concept of "content curation" is nothing new. Throwing social media outlets into the mix may be newer, but the idea of staying awake and engaged to things around you that interest you is, in no way, new. I follow Lee Odden's TopRank Marketing blog because it's packed full of good interesting marketing stuff, but the fact is that I also like the way he tells stories and I enjoy the content of his stories. I find them both relevant and interesting. Take a look at what he recently penned about why so many companies suck at social media:

"Part of the problem is that most companies are not inherently “social” to begin with. It’s not in their DNA to understand what it means for individual employees to start having conversations with the social web at large as representatives of a company personality. Marketing is about many things including connecting audiences with products they want to buy. Marketing on the social web is less about the tradition of packaging and distributing information and more about companies being able to connect with customers in ways that are both meaningful to those customers and to the goals of the business."

See? Good stuff. Not necessarily a concept that upsets the apple cart, but one that is worth revisiting if you are trying to understand the difference between being social and doing social.

Speaking of relevant, interesting and social...let the weekend begin!



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